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As someone who has struggled with gambling addiction for a long time, I understand firsthand the challenges of maintaining sobriety. One moment, you feel like you are finally gaining back control, and the next, there is this overwhelming urge to gamble.
Believe it or not, a mundane trip to the grocery store helped me learn to enjoy food again. The year was 2019. I had recently moved across the United States from Florida to Arizona. And in my new zip code, there was a Trader Joe's on almost every corner. I am aware that makes me come across as a basic Millennial stereotype (which I own, for the record), but living near Trader Joe's has proven to be a crucial milestone in my eating disorder recovery. Here's how this grocery store helped me learn to enjoy food again—and to eat what I love without shame.
Verbal abuse can yield many adverse side effects for individuals exposed to this behavior. Cognitive disorders, like all-or-nothing thinking, can be one of the possible results of verbal abuse. However, it isn't just verbally abusive actions that can cause this. Anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem are often the source of all-or-nothing thinking. 
Gratitude is trendy -- it's been in for a couple of years now. And whenever something becomes popular, many of us jump on the bandwagon. Of course, ample research suggests that practicing gratitude benefits your mental health. But what if your gratitude isn't genuine but forced? Can it then backfire and harm your mental health? Let's take a look. 
Code-switching in borderline personality disorder (BPD) is something I've been trying to understand lately. I know so far that it's a survival strategy I've clung to in a reality where the threat of rejection casts its shadow over everything.
I am an introvert coping with depression. There are different levels and degrees of being an introvert. Regardless, being introverted is a personality trait where you thrive on independence and recharge mentally when alone. Introverts can also become emotionally drained when they are in social settings, including being at work. So how is someone who is an introvert supposed to reach out for help and not become entirely isolated when they are experiencing an episode of depression? Even though it has been difficult, within the last couple of years, I have come up with some ways of coping with my depression that do not emotionally drain me but allow me not to become isolated. 
Twenty years after being sexually assaulted, my childhood trauma made me sick. At the age of 24, I learned — the hard way — that if you ignore your emotions for too long, they will find other ways to get your attention.
My name is Dawn Gressard, and I am ecstatic to be a new writer for the "Coping with Depression" blog at HealthyPlace. As a trainer of peer support specialists, I know how vital it is to share similar lived experiences with others, not only for our coping with depression and recovery but for others’ coping as well. It is always easier to endure the journey when you know you are not alone -- and none of us are.
There are several ways an individual may react to verbal abuse. Two of these common responses include fawning and appeasement. Although they share some similar characteristics, each is unique and can produce alternative results. 
About 16 years ago, I was prescribed an antipsychotic for my schizoaffective disorder, and it triggered obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms. Here are some of the ways I acted with schizoaffective disorder and OCD.

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Mary
I was ghosted after a hypomanic episode by 2 very close friends. It’s extremely damaging and very hard to overcome. I was diagnosed with major depression two years prior so nobody knew I had bipolar. It still hurts many years later. and has made me scared to ever disclose my diagnosis. I always feel like people will reject me for having this illness.
Rick Sanchez
Thank you for writing this. I often tell people my tombstone won’t have my name or dates on it. It’ll just say “Finally Something Good Happened”
Jonathan C
Natasha, this article is obviously a magnet for people who are experiencing this very thing. I appreciate you writing it and replying to many of the people who wrote in. I also imagine that it's pretty heavy getting all these responses. I am praying for you, and for each person who commented here. I hope you all are feeling and doing better than you were at that time. I hear you, and I am so sorry to hear what you were and perhaps still are going through.
Ruth
my client is not able or not willing to believe that his persecutor parts have a good side or mean to protect him. what do I say to him.
Thank you.
Janet
I think if it was an alter, he wouldn’t use his own identity and you would see a 360 degree change in his lifestyle.