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Writing uplifting poetry is one of my favorite ways to promote mental wellbeing. A few weeks ago, I read my poetry and gave a speech at a local event for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). During my speech, I talked about my experience using creativity to cope with anxiety and depression. To learn about my public speaking experience and how it affected my confidence, continue reading this post.
What are your personal values, and how do they affect your self-esteem? We all have different values that we live by. They can be honesty, generosity, kindness, happiness, loyalty, patience, etc. These values play a crucial role in building our lives. They help shape how we think and act with others. They also influence our emotions, making them essential in building self-esteem. In this article, we look at the relationship between personal values and self-esteem and how to use these values to build our self-worth and confidence.
Happiness matters. It's easy to get caught up in the hustle and bustle of daily life, constantly pushing ourselves to do more and more in the quest for success. However, it's important to remember that genuine satisfaction comes from doing what you love. Whether it's a hobby, a passion project, or a career path, prioritizing your happiness can profoundly impact your health and wellbeing.
Someone recently asked me what fun things I have planned for the summer. Surprisingly, that felt like a loaded, triggering question. As a sober person who doesn't have a driver's license or disposable income, I get jealous and resentful when people talk about their vacation plans. The fear of missing out (FOMO) surfaces, and I feel excluded from that version of fun. 
Do you know that saying that other people’s opinions of you are none of your business? As much as I try to keep that in my head, that’s easier said than followed, and other people's perceptions of me trigger negative thoughts.
Today I'd like to share the challenges I face balancing weight loss and avoiding becoming "hangry" (hungry plus angry) with schizoaffective disorder.
You can still find a negative stigma around mental health and medication treatment for many individuals. How others perceive them with the knowledge that they use pharmaceuticals can be negative. However, there is not one right answer, and medication treatment needs can change significantly throughout the healing process when recovering from verbal abuse. 
I'm anxious for my first session with the personal trainer I hired to coach me for a Himalayan trek I'll be doing in about six months. It's quite unlike me to invest in an exercise program financially. Usually, I just lace up my sneakers and start running until I can't summon the energy for one more step. I even forget to stretch my muscles beforehand sometimes (terrible habit, I know).
I've learned something about anxiety and conflict. For fear of the discomfort that accompanies conflict, I will often try to do my best to avoid any situation that might result in opposition, tension, or some sort of disagreement.
I had never heard of gambling addiction being a possible side effect of aripiprazole (Abilify) or any other drug. That's why I was shocked to read the headline, "Patients given aripiprazole 'should be told of gambling addiction risks'" in "The Guardian." I consider "The Guardian" to be a source of reliable and fact-checked information, so I looked into it further. It turns out that many people have now recognized that a possible side effect of aripiprazole is gambling addiction.

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Comments

Elizabeth Caudy
Hi Kellie. Thank you for your comment. Thank you for complimenting me on my song... I'm in the middle of composing another one! Best, Elizabeth
Kellie Holly
Hi Elizabeth, I think your song is pretty. I hope you keep composing and playing.
Dawn Gressard
Hello Ash!
It is wonderful to hear that you are embracing YOUR progression. Although it is natural to compare ourselves to others around us, it is unhealthy. However, it does take self-awareness, continuous practice, and willingness to change our thinking. The fact is that we are all 100% unique, and there is no one else like us. Thus, we can only follow our own journey and walk along at our own speed when it comes to recovery. How we recover is normal -- at least for us.
Think of it like this: trauma is our normal reaction to an abnormal event, plain and simple. It doesn't matter if someone else doesn't think our trauma is valid -- it is precisely that, OURS. In return, our journey of recovery should also be OUR normal progression from the trauma or mental health condition.
I am happy to hear that you can change your thinking and are trying to not compare yourself to others. Keep strong and go forward at your own pace.
Dawn Gressard
Hi Mary-Ann!
Unfortunately, the blogger who originally posted the poem is no longer at HealthyPlace. I did an internet search for the poem and could not find the poem titled "I'm Here for You." I would have to conclude that it is an original from the blogger or someone she knows. It is a beautiful post!
Dawn Gressard
That's a great question! Word of mouth is a great resource. If you have people you trust in the same area, ask around - everyone seems to know someone. However, you can ask your primary care physician about a recommended psychiatrist or Google "ZocDoc." On this website, you can read reviews and see what ratings psychiatrists in your area have.
As for lawyers, Google the Bar Association of your home state. There should be a list of resources and listings for the type of lawyer you need. I hope this helps!