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I have permission to enjoy food. As obvious as this sounds, it's one of the most impactful realizations I've come to learn in eating disorder recovery. In the darkest seasons of my illness, I believed that showing a preference for any food at all was a sign of weakness. I would not allow myself to acknowledge pleasure in the flavors or textures of anything I ate. Food was purely utilitarian back then—I consumed just enough to stay alive and placate the concerns of those around me. But the more I heal, the more I learn that food is a source of nourishment and enjoyment. So I can grant myself permission to experience both.
Last summer, my boyfriend and I enjoyed celebrating our birthdays and the Fourth of July together for the first time. But after our relationship ended in late July, I felt like a mess. This past year since the breakup, every holiday and milestone was very difficult for me. Now that nearly a year has passed since the breakup, I have learned how to continue my single life. Here are five coping methods that have helped me.
When I have racing thoughts, feel overwhelmed, and feel like things are out of control, it becomes a major struggle to feel a sense of calm. Calmness, when you're anxious, becomes difficult to achieve, at least at the moment, because it's so hard to quiet all of the other thoughts and resulting symptoms that accompany anxiety, especially when you experience a panic attack. So, then I try to pull myself away from being overstimulated. 
In my experience, adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) creates strong impulsivity. For me, that means buying unnecessary items, diving into uncertain situations without proper consideration, and being a poor conversationalist.
Each summer, I am greeted by a familiar experience. I shake my routines and try to squeeze in being outside and seeing people I haven't seen in a while. Summer draws out my restless, ambitious side. I've realized in previous summers that this frenzy of activity affects the routine that keeps me in recovery from binge eating disorder (BED). This summer, I am reminding myself what I need to do to savor the summer months while not engaging in eating disorder behavior.
Saying goodbye is never easy, but it is crucial because everything ends. After writing for three years for "Work and Bipolar or Depression," my journey has taken a bittersweet turn. This is my last post about work and depression, and I want to express my gratitude to team HealthyPlace and my readers.
Regardless of the methods involved, self-harm can make you tired in ways you might never have expected.
When I first began experiencing the onset of depression, I was confused and terrified. Although vague and patchy, at the time, I did have a basic understanding of how the disease typically presented itself in individuals. I was adamant that what I felt was not synonymous with someone who was depressed. The emotions I was experiencing didn't align with the accounts of other individuals who had experienced depression. Not only was I confused and terrified, but I also felt like an outcast in the community that theoretically should have provided me with solace.
Verbal abuse can rear its ugly head anywhere to anyone, including children in a school setting. Unfortunately, it can be more than a child's peers who use name-calling or teasing to get the attention they want. In some situations, the trusted adults in the classroom who receive payment to guide our children and help them learn are the ones throwing around insults and demeaning kids. Verbal abuse can happen at school.
Writing has always been a healthy outlet for me to process and express my feelings. I have been writing since I was a young girl, and it has helped me through some of the darkest periods in my life. Throughout my time writing for HealthyPlace, I have had some incredible personal breakthroughs and have been able to connect with many others who battle similar demons. However, my path has taken me in a different direction, and I am saying a final goodbye to my readers within the "Debunking Addiction" blog.

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Preston Vance
Hey Natasha, I have the exact same thing with my bipolar. Musical earworms usually in a chord sequence I make up in my head but if I hear a song it will replace it with that. Only shuts off when I get distracted. Funny thing is, it didn't start until I started taking Quetiapine with my Lamotrigine.
Em
I need advice asap, I have scars across my whole lower left arm and I have dance with a teacher who makes us wear leotards that show our whole arms and doesn't allow any layers. I don't have any plasters, makeup or bracelets and my scars are quite red and bumpy, any ideas?
Dianna Shelton
Hi there my name is Dianna. You have to forgive yourself for doing it to yourself and to move forward you choose you. You look yourself in the mirror and you say I love you and it’s what we tell ourselves you say I will and I can move forward it’s the whole cycle of abuse you know the fights we love each other and then the honeymoon phase and fighting so it’s a chemical issue and happening in the brain so you have to substitute That for something positive now, gardening walking exercise, sunshine swimming you don’t need a man you don’t need anyone’s validation and the forgiveness. You have to forgive yourself OK so important get rid of anything that he reminds you of it was jewelry get rid of it you have to learn to love yourself , I’m so sorry you went through this we are addicted to the chaos we’re addicted to the abuse it’s somewhere in your childhood possibly maybe you can’t remember so we re-created it and our adulthood also, maybe there’s something you’re really feeling guilty about from your childhood to stay strong you have to stay smart especially if you’re a mother if you can’t do it for you you can do it for your angels your babies you’re grown children whatever it is You deserve happiness he’s not capable of love all that is his powering control. You know that he grew up with that. It’s a different time now women are feminist women can be alone you have to take the control. It’s your term now to rescue your inner child this happened possibly in your childhood but it has a happy ending. Nobody can save you but yourself nobody can do it for you but you And this time you’re gonna be careful where you put yourself try prayer if you’re lonely get in with the church group I want you to make it. My thoughts and prayers are with you. You have to fight the addiction you have to if you have to take a nap whatever it is get some sun get some exercise get in with church Day at a time and the flags know the red flags you have to take it slow next time give your self a chance you can be happy all alone you can try being friends OK you have to protect yourself can you can you just please protect yourself all the best all God‘s blessings on you take care of yourself Stay smart stay safe!
Andrea
I cannot find the APA journal article you referenced.
Mina
I've been looking around different websites, since I'm having trouble comprehending some stuff, but I do have a question.
What does it mean when someone says 'source'? Like, is it the origin of said fictive/alter?
I'm currently trying to figure out if i have DID or OSDD-1b or not. And i'm trying to figure out certian terms/vocabulary so i can understand this better-

I would appreciate if someone replies!