advertisement

Blogs

Did you know that burnout is common for individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD)? In this article, I talk about how I used hard work as an unhealthy coping mechanism and what happened when it all came crashing down, and burnout came for me.
The word "neurodivergent" is flung around social media and is now very politically correct. For example, it's supposedly okay to call a person "neurodivergent," whereas calling them "mentally ill" will get you social media-canceled. But if people insist on using the term neurodivergent, then let's at least know what it means and how to use it properly.
Nobody likes cleaning. Wait. That's not right, because I've known people who enjoy cleaning as it provides a sense of accomplishment or something else I can't comprehend. Not me. I hate cleaning. I especially hate the big jobs. They give me anxiety. Of course, I procrastinate, the job gets bigger, and my anxiety increases. So, I procrastinate some more. And I do it again and again. It is a circle of procrastination and anxiety that eventually must be tackled.
Throughout my life, I've had to deal with two diametrically opposed traits of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): inattentiveness and hyperfocus.
Anxiety and self-confidence usually don't coincide with one another, in my experience. I've also found that it is important to find ways to boost my confidence. Otherwise, it is easy to allow my anxiety to overwhelm many aspects of my daily life.
Living with borderline personality disorder (BPD), many aspects of my identity have felt unstable over the years, including my sexuality. I came out as bisexual in 2000 or 2001, but after about a year of dating women, I went on to date cis men almost exclusively. My sexual attraction to women never went away, but the way I feel about it has fluctuated. I had trouble accepting my bisexuality.
A few months ago, I talked to my therapist about the sources of my low self-esteem and constant comparisons with other people. I thought it originally started from childhood bullying by other students. But my therapist mentioned that two of my former teachers' emotional abuse might have had long-term effects as well. To learn more about my experience with abuse and how it still affects me in adulthood, read on.
In the aftermath of one of my mental breakdowns, a wise friend once told me that "sometimes you have to think your way into acting differently, and sometimes you have to act your way into thinking differently." I guarantee he didn't come up with this catchy phrase himself, but I give him full credit for introducing me to the notion that when it comes to changing your feelings, your body is as valuable of a mechanism as your mind. If your mind is already sour, thinking yourself into a more positive experience probably isn't an option. You're better off acting your way into thinking differently—or better: biohacking your way into thinking differently.
This week on "Snap Out of It!", I talk with, well, me. I share my own story of what it’s like to work with a mental illness. I talk about mental illness stigma in the workplace and finally leaving the workplace because of mental illness. I also talk about some basic statistics about why mental illness in the workplace matters, and I answer your questions.
The secret shame of self-harm is a heavy burden—one that, especially when borne alone, can slow us down and hinder the healing process. Self-harm recovery begins with learning to let the shame of self-harm go.

Follow Us

advertisement

Most Popular

Comments

C
I feel I cannot hold on. For the last few years I have been loosing more and more with no recovery. My breakdowns are costing me my family relationships. They just do know what else to do and they are feeling the pain too. We have no help,hope no one I just kept hoping I do not inhale another breath help
Elizabeth Caudy
Hi Jaime Lee, Thank you for your comment. What you're describing could be signs of a mental illness, but without knowing more about you, it's impossible to say which one, if any. If what you're describing is causing you distress (which it sounds like it is) or if you think you might have a mental illness, you should talk to a medical professional. If schizophrenia is a possibility, you will likely need a referral to a psychiatrist. When you see someone, make sure to be as open as you can about what you're experiencing. I know it can be scary having these thoughts, but you're not alone, and seeing a psychiatrist can help you figure out what's going on and how to get better.
Jaime Lee Casiano
Hi I'm Jaime Lee Casiano I think that I might have schizophrenia. I don't hallucinate though I can be very delusional sometimes believing things are going on that know one else sees thy could be true they could be false I know that but I feel like I have to simi believe them in order to protect myself. Im overall a very paranoid person It's like I wana know everything that's going on around me so I try to read people in evry possible way you could read someone. I try to find the side of them they don't want anyone else knowing about. My mind is always racing thinking about different scenarios. It's Also hard for me to communicate properly with people or form relationships though I wana be social there for I die inside.


Dawn Gressard
Hello Andrea!
You are absolutely correct when you said, "They're still going to act like people." People are people who will act in ways we wish they wouldn't -- even the ones closest to us. That statement can be a large pill to swallow, yet it is one that we need to get down if we want to sustain our mental health. I have a specific page in my journal that lists things I can control and can't. I often look at it to remind myself that I can't control other people's actions, choices, or feelings.
Douglas Howe
Trauma for 34 years