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People with borderline personality disorder often have issues with feelings of rejection. In fact, the feeling of rejection is the thing that gets under my skin the most. With borderline personality disorder (BPD), even the tiniest microexpression can make me feel like I'm going off the deep end. Now, there's this one time that sticks out like a sore thumb when it comes to feeling rejected -- the classic "no text back" scenario.
I recently learned the value of practicing stillness. I spent the last two weeks overseas in Nepal, immersing myself in a culture and climate so marvelously different from my own. I embarked on this journey expecting to learn about another unique way of life—and I most certainly have. But in the process, I also encountered lessons that challenged my current relationship with body image, mental health, and personal growth as a whole. To be more specific, my time in Nepal has shown me the value of practicing stillness in eating disorder recovery.
Sometimes, you have to leave a queer relationship. All breakups are hard, no matter how you look at it. I have found my queer breakups to be particularly challenging, however. I think for some of us, this can have to do with living portions of our lives authentically, and when we finally are dating the gender or genders of partners that we truly desire, emotions can become intense, and so can connections. My excitement about being with a woman for the first time blinded me from being able to see some of the major issues in our dynamic. But now, I've identified five signs it's time to leave your queer relationship that I wish I had thought about earlier.
There are many times when I can't think. It's a bit of a problem for a contracted writer. You do need to be able to think in order to write. And in spite of the fact that it impacts my livelihood, I can't think way too often.
Anticipatory anxiety is more severe than stressing out about a current situation. Clinical psychologist Sally Winston and master clinician Martin Seif define anticipatory anxiety as a fear of failure and other bad things that might happen in the future. As a result of anticipatory anxiety, many people avoid important tasks and new things. To learn about my experience with anticipatory anxiety and change and how I managed it, continue reading this post.
As autumn — or fall — arrives after the scorching summer, I gladly welcome it as the season of gratitude. Whether it's the feeling of relief as the oppressive heat and humidity fade away or eager anticipation of the seasonal foods that become available, it always fills me with an overwhelming sense of appreciation. For me, fall is the season of gratitude. 
I’ve written a lot about my past knee replacement surgery in my right leg. But I have another knee replacement in my left leg in less than a month. Since I know what to expect, I can prepare better this time. Hopefully, because of this, my schizoaffective anxiety won’t flare up as badly because of the surgery.
Recently, I witnessed verbal abuse of a stranger during my hospital stay that made me angry. Because I've been the target of verbal abuse, I know how hurtful words can make someone feel. I wanted to ensure that no one would have to feel like I did because of verbal abuse. To get a clear picture of the situation, the verbal abuse of a stranger started in a hospital setting. It came from a healthcare aide who didn't want to deal with an elderly woman in a long-term care bed who needed help.
Recently, I received news that someone I am close to is very sick. I think one of the most difficult anxiety triggers that I may be confronted with is when someone I care about is ill.
It is normal and pleasurable to revisit the past and reminisce every now and then. But have you ever wondered how much nostalgia is good for your health? Let's find out.

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Comments

Rizza Bermio-Gonzalez
Hi Jennafer,

Thank you for your comments. I'm so glad this article was helpful for you. Practicing mindfulness has been truly helpful for me in coping with anxiety. I recommend awareness of what your senses are taking in. It takes a bit of practice, but it is very beneficial!

All the best,
Rizza
Kate
Read Howard Glasser’s transforming the intense child. It’s lifesaving!
Jennafer
I appreciate this article. I especially like the part about staying grounded and being mindful of the moment. I need to incorporate this in my life more often. It can be useful in situations when one is unable to step away!
Mary-Ann
Hello , Who wrote this poem please ?
Ash
I love with what we believe to be autoimmune disease. My anxiety an illness have become to great to get to an actual doctor for real testing, and actual diagnosis. I've been working on trying to get over my anxiety of possibly getting stuck somewhere or getting sick in public. I haven't done the most amazing job at getting out of the house, an I started to compare my recovery speed to others. I see other people able to just jump right into a car, or go out to eat as if they never had a fear of it, but then there's me who gets nervous just being in my yard. I compare their relationship with food to mine, hygiene abilities to mine, ECT. I have yet to stop entirely, however I am learning to embrace my progression instead of cry over the potential future failures.