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Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
An anxiety plan is something you can create on your own or with a therapist as a type of mental health treatment plan. Such a plan can be as simple as anxiety-reducing ideas jotted down in a dedicated notebook or as complex as a detailed record of medications and their successes, notes you take when visiting with your doctor and/or therapist, the anxiety symptoms you experience and the circumstances in which you notice them, and any other detail about your anxiety and treatment of it that you find helpful.
Martha Lueck
There are many stereotypes and assumptions about introverted and extroverted people. For instance, extroverts are stereotyped as social butterflies. Introverts, on the other hand, are stereotyped as hermits. However, the stereotypes and assumptions for introverts and extroverts are not true for everyone. These stereotypes and assumptions can also be harmful for mental health. Mental health issues affect introverts and extroverts in different ways. Continue reading this post to learn more.
TJ DeSalvo
In a recent post, I discussed the frustrations I’ve encountered dealing with people reacting to anxiety who, in my opinion, don’t do it in a way that’s helpful. I mentioned viewing anxiety as something scary and deviant isn’t the right way to do it, and that the reality of living with anxiety should be viewed with more nuance. I want to go a bit further into this in this post, suggesting that the reality of living with day-to-day anxiety is much more mundane.
Nori Rose Hubert
The decision to disclose your bipolar at work is an important one. You may feel unsure of whether or not you should speak to your employer about your illness, or worried that you could face professional or personal repercussions for speaking up. There are risks to talking about bipolar at work, as well as potential benefits.
Mary-Elizabeth Schurrer
If you have a history of eating disorder behaviors or mindsets, then you have most likely body checked yourself, or stood in front of a mirror and scrutinized your reflection with a severe and merciless eye. Chances are, you understand how it feels to wither beneath your own cruel gaze which repeatedly dissects the size, weight, shape, and curvature of a frame that will never be adequate to you. This ritual is known as compulsive body checking, and it can worsen your eating disorder tendencies. But if that toxic pattern sounds familiar, rest assured, it is possible to break yourself of a compulsive body checking habit.
Jessica Kaley
When you trust your decisions, your self-esteem will grow. People with poor self-esteem often second-guess themselves and defer to others' opinions. While it's true that there are people who know more than you do on almost every topic, there is one subject on which you are the world's leading expert, and that subject is you.
Megan Griffith
Countless times, people have told me that a person can only start to heal if they are ready to do the work themselves. They can't be forced into improving their lives. Despite hearing this message over and over, part of me really thought I could convince other people to heal and "get better" if I just said and did the right thing. This probably comes from a history of being responsible for co-regulating my parents' emotions. I grew up having to say and do the right thing to maintain my worth, and for a long time, that felt normal.
August Queue
How to help your child cope with autistic meltdowns is a question for many parents. Recently, on a message board for autistic adults and allies, a parent asked for some advice on helping her child with his autistic meltdowns. While these sorts of groups and message boards weren’t around when I was young, I sure wish my mom had done this sort of thing when I was a kid.
Nicola Spendlove
When we were little, I spoke on behalf of my brother a lot because he had a speech delay. He would regularly mix up or mispronounce his words, and I would find myself acting as some sort of amateur translator when he spoke to anyone outside our immediate family. My most commonly used phrase was, "What he's trying to say is . . ."
Natasha Tracy
Medical consensus in psychiatry is critical. Many people do have many opinions, of course, but understanding psychiatric medical consensus is what makes all the difference. If you have 1000 psychiatrists in a room, after all, you can be guaranteed someone is going to disagree on any subject, but who do you believe, the 999 or the one? And is a medical consensus in psychiatry worth more than the opinion of psychiatric patients?

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Phillip Moreno (Phizzle)
My wife was unfaithful after 16 years of being together I found out she was doing whatever from pictures and to everything in between,it only lasted a month but it caused me to split my emotions into alternate personalitys where one was always crying anywhere I was at(embarrassing),one was a jerk and was getting me in dangerous trouble,and another seemed to be a moment of myself in highschool,and me who seemed to be low self-esteem when I used to be happy.
In between certain times I would be sitting at my place when I would get a vision on my wife and her lover and the next thing I knew I was at the store with my wife saying I was acting childishly and crying the whole time,but I thought I fell asleep,then another time I was eating dinner and I looked at my wife and felt heartache then it happened again when I came to and we where walking down the street arguing and she said that I was being a big her and being mean!
Then I found out about (DID) and it explained alot of how I was feeling,my wife said when crying I sounded like a little boy she never heard me talk like that out of the 16 years we've been together,and when I was being mean she said I had a stronger dominant tone(that she also mentioned sounded attractive) but was intimidating.
So I was wondering (besides following me around on camera) is there anyway to be conscious or aware of what's happening when a switch is triggered?
I was diagnosed with depression and bipolar and social anxiety when I was a teenager but had thought I stabled out in my early twenties when I met my wife but am beginning to feel as if I was an alter ego all these years that was fronted because he was able to handle everyday life,and lost control of switching when the trauma of my wife cheated on me.
Is that even a possibility?
I don't have much recollection of when I was younger but little faint dream like memories but I figured it was so long ago and don't remember much before meeting my wife.
Or does this all sound pretty crazy?
Cindy hollowau
I totally agree..l wrote president trump which assured me 10 billion would go back into mental health..it was Reagan that pulled all the money from this cause ..my son has schitzoeffective disorder and is 27
Cindy holloway
I so feel for you.. l have lived in this system and it stinks .. my son is 27 and l have seen him catatonic 4 times .. he has been in state hospitals for 3 years of his life ..1.5 million has been spent so far on his illness..it’s been such a tough road and very little support from family at all.
Vivian
What can I do when a family member just starts saying some "verbal abuse like" words? It has nothing to do with a fight, they are not in a bad mood, they just say it casually as if that's the truth. Am I being too sensitive to those casual (hurtful) words? What should I do? It hurts. I feel like crying when writing this comment. This has been going on for a while now but it just this past 2 weeks that I started noticing it. I kinda wish I hadn't noticed it, that way I'm not hurting so bad.
Laura A. Barton
Hi there, Bill. That kind of estimation is definitely disheartening and I can see why it seems like it'd be easier to just cut ties with those who are like that. It can be a difficult decision to make and there are a lot of factors to consider when doing so. I definitely encourage you to do whatever is best for your mental health. Working with a therapist might be a good way to work out what that is, and HealthyPlace has a number of resources listed right on this site here: https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/mental-illness-overview/how-to-find-mental-health-services-in-your-area

I hope that my suggestions from this post also helps. Building ourselves to better handle these situations can bring a lot of peace of mind; at least that's what I've found and I hope others do as well. Wishing you the best, whatever you decide. Just know that you're not alone.