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Amanda Richardson
I've been in recovery for years now, and it never ceases to amaze me how impactful and effective a supportive community can be when fighting your addictions. Maintaining a close-knit community throughout 2020 has been especially challenging due to the highly infectious disease of COVID-19 and so many groups and gatherings being highly limited or canceled altogether. Because of this unfortunate turn of events, recovering addicts are forced to be extra creative and intentional in order to hold themselves accountable and seek support in their communities.
Jennifer Lear
We are living in an age of unprecedented mental health awareness and mental illness empathy. Mental health stigma is decreasing. Mental health charities, awareness campaigns, and changes to the law in the last 10 years have created a social landscape where people feel much safer talking about their problems without the fear of being mocked, abused, and alienated. As someone with a mental illness, you would think I'd be thrilled by this, but the truth is that up until quite recently, I resented it.
Tanya J. Peterson, MS, NCC
Anxiety and uncertainty seem to be at an all-time high. Some are experiencing problematic anxiety (anxious thoughts, emotions, and physical symptoms that interfere in daily life) for the first time, while others who have lived with it, including those with anxiety disorders, are finding that their symptoms continue to worsen. While there are no quick fixes for anxiety (and anxiety itself is part of the human condition), I offer you here a way to reduce anxiety and create inner peace in spite of all the uncertainty around us.
Mahevash Shaikh
First off, I want to clarify that depression and victim mentality are not the same. The former is a mental illness that no one can choose, while the latter is a mindset that may or may not be a choice. That said, victim mentality does play a role in depression, which is why it is crucial to identify and manage it.
TJ DeSalvo
Many people experience both anxiety and depression, and I'm one of them. About a month ago, I had what’s called a major depressive episode. Though I am not at my lowest point anymore, I am still dealing with the aftereffects of that episode and probably will for some time. This is not the first time I’ve had to deal with such an episode, so I think it is appropriate to devote an entry to attempt to come to terms with it. Please forgive me if I don’t sound enthused; my drive continues to be shot. Despite that, I will do the best I can.
Jessica Kaley
There's a well-known saying that goes, "Other people's opinions are none of your business," and when it comes to your journey to build self-esteem, this needs to be taken to heart. Self-esteem issues are often very connected to how much we allow other people's opinions to color our own. Read on to learn how my quest to build stronger self-esteem was affected by other people's opinions.
Annabelle Clawson
It's 7 A.M., my alarm goes off, and I can't get out of bed this morning. Some days, when I'm feeling really ambitious, I hit "snooze" and crawl out of my covers nine minutes later. Most days, however, I turn off the alarm and return to the safety of my slumber. When I finally wake up hours later, to afternoon sunshine forcing its way through my eyelids, I feel disoriented, disappointed, and dysfunctional. I wonder why I can't leave my bed.
Mary-Elizabeth Schurrer
November is officially here, which means now is the time to create an eating disorder (ED) recovery action plan for the holidays. This season can be a minefield to navigate with an eating disorder, no matter where you're at in the healing process, so it's crucial to determine in advance how you will prioritize eating disorder recovery in the midst of whatever triggers you face these next couple of months.
Hollay Ghadery
I've already written about exercise in eating disorder recovery, but what I have not written about, specifically, is the role of strength training in eating disorder recovery. Everyone's road to recovery is different, but for me, taking the emphasis off weight loss through cardiovascular training and putting it on becoming stronger through resistance training was life-changing.
Krystle Vermes
There is nothing worse than thinking you're going to get a good night's rest, only to find yourself tossing and turning for hours until your alarm goes off. A poor night’s sleep can impact the following day, leading to a loss in productivity and low energy levels across the board. When you have a mental health condition such as dissociative identity disorder (DID), these types of nights are common, but they don’t have to have a lasting negative impact on your overall quality of life.

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Comments

Phillip Moreno (Phizzle)
My wife was unfaithful after 16 years of being together I found out she was doing whatever from pictures and to everything in between,it only lasted a month but it caused me to split my emotions into alternate personalitys where one was always crying anywhere I was at(embarrassing),one was a jerk and was getting me in dangerous trouble,and another seemed to be a moment of myself in highschool,and me who seemed to be low self-esteem when I used to be happy.
In between certain times I would be sitting at my place when I would get a vision on my wife and her lover and the next thing I knew I was at the store with my wife saying I was acting childishly and crying the whole time,but I thought I fell asleep,then another time I was eating dinner and I looked at my wife and felt heartache then it happened again when I came to and we where walking down the street arguing and she said that I was being a big her and being mean!
Then I found out about (DID) and it explained alot of how I was feeling,my wife said when crying I sounded like a little boy she never heard me talk like that out of the 16 years we've been together,and when I was being mean she said I had a stronger dominant tone(that she also mentioned sounded attractive) but was intimidating.
So I was wondering (besides following me around on camera) is there anyway to be conscious or aware of what's happening when a switch is triggered?
I was diagnosed with depression and bipolar and social anxiety when I was a teenager but had thought I stabled out in my early twenties when I met my wife but am beginning to feel as if I was an alter ego all these years that was fronted because he was able to handle everyday life,and lost control of switching when the trauma of my wife cheated on me.
Is that even a possibility?
I don't have much recollection of when I was younger but little faint dream like memories but I figured it was so long ago and don't remember much before meeting my wife.
Or does this all sound pretty crazy?
Cindy hollowau
I totally agree..l wrote president trump which assured me 10 billion would go back into mental health..it was Reagan that pulled all the money from this cause ..my son has schitzoeffective disorder and is 27
Cindy holloway
I so feel for you.. l have lived in this system and it stinks .. my son is 27 and l have seen him catatonic 4 times .. he has been in state hospitals for 3 years of his life ..1.5 million has been spent so far on his illness..it’s been such a tough road and very little support from family at all.
Vivian
What can I do when a family member just starts saying some "verbal abuse like" words? It has nothing to do with a fight, they are not in a bad mood, they just say it casually as if that's the truth. Am I being too sensitive to those casual (hurtful) words? What should I do? It hurts. I feel like crying when writing this comment. This has been going on for a while now but it just this past 2 weeks that I started noticing it. I kinda wish I hadn't noticed it, that way I'm not hurting so bad.
Laura A. Barton
Hi there, Bill. That kind of estimation is definitely disheartening and I can see why it seems like it'd be easier to just cut ties with those who are like that. It can be a difficult decision to make and there are a lot of factors to consider when doing so. I definitely encourage you to do whatever is best for your mental health. Working with a therapist might be a good way to work out what that is, and HealthyPlace has a number of resources listed right on this site here: https://www.healthyplace.com/other-info/mental-illness-overview/how-to-find-mental-health-services-in-your-area

I hope that my suggestions from this post also helps. Building ourselves to better handle these situations can bring a lot of peace of mind; at least that's what I've found and I hope others do as well. Wishing you the best, whatever you decide. Just know that you're not alone.